Month: June 2011

Preschool mom again

My five-year old daughter has been going to school for two weeks now. Yet it felt like it’s only my first time to be a preschool mom. For one, I never had to bring my older child to school and wait upon her until classes were over when she was in kindergarten. It was simply because my work schedule was in conflict with her class schedule. I also do not remember ever interacting with her classmates’ mothers then, although I would see her class adviser and principal from time to time to check her progress or whenever her monthly tuition fee is due. However, with my younger child, I find myself now in a different situation. For the first time, I am experiencing what I believe is the life of a regular preschool mom. I have to bring my little Z to school, wait for her until her classes are over, even if I have already hired someone to bring her to school and pick her up as well by tricycle. It wasn’t the second day of school that I started interacting …

The Jonah in me

When I think about my own relationship with God, I remember the story of Jonah. This morning, instead of reading just the first three verses of the Book for my irregular daily devotions, I read the whole Book. Reading it made me face the fact that I am being rebellious again despite my attempts to mask the attitude. “Have you any right to be angry?” the LORD asked Jonah on two separate occasions. And I found myself in the same boat as Jonah, being asked the same question. No, I have not been faithfully reading my Bible lately or being obedient to God’s Word for that matter. My prayers are too shallow–I recite them with no feelings at all. Sometimes, I would only pray because my children urge me to lead them or because the situation seems to call for it. And because I have not been meditating on God’s Word, I get easily irritated or angered lately. So why am I acting rebellious again? What’s making me feel angry that sometimes, like Jonah, I …

“Mom, at what age would you like me to get married?”

“Mom, at what age would you like me to get married?” I have a feeling that I should start expecting such questions from them beginning today. Actually, I should have thought of that when my older child asked me yesterday whether she’d get rich when she grows up. I don’t think they really understand the meaning of marry or marriage, but going back to their question, I answered “30” to my older child A, and “35” to my younger one Z. Why much later for Z? Because she’s younger and so baby-ish that I think it would take a long time before we let her go. As for A, I suppose it’s given–because she’s older, she’d mature faster and would want to leave the nest sooner. And well, I have this feeling that she would want to be independent the soonest possible, so I’d rather brace myself… that doesn’t seem to make sense though, does it? A gave a follow-up question: the perennial why. Why? Because according to studies, the human brain does not become fully mature until the age 25. And, …

“Mom, will I be rich when I grow up?”

(Referring to my eldest brother as a role model of success.) My 7-year old daughter asked me out of the blue whether she would be rich when she grew up.  I was startled especially that she asked it while I was accompanying her to the bathroom last night and I was just getting impatient to go back to my laptop. Well, what could I say? I began to think about my eldest brother, the most successful person in our brood. My mother always believed that he was successful because he always honored them–our parents, that is. Whenever he was being criticized or scolded by either of our parents, he would just keep silent, patiently listen, bow down his head, and never answer back. (Of course, there are other ways that a person could show respect to his/her parents, but not answering back or being rebellious must be the most obvious act of respect parents could see.) I suppose she’s right. After all, it’s in the Bible: Children, obey your parents in the Lord, for this is right.  “Honor your father and mother”—which is …